Conrad Bladey's
Beuk O'

Newcassel Sangs


The Tradition of Northumbria
 

 

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During the last many decades ye even centuries!, so great has been the progress of education  amongst the humbler classes of society, that many of those  eccentricities so often seized upon by our local poets as subjects  of humorous satire, are fast disappearing, and ere many more years   shall have elapsed, the Songs of our Local Bards will be the only  memorials of the peculiar characteristics of this ancient border town.  Should an occasional coarseness of language meet the eye,  let not the fastidious reader forget, that such were the modes of  expression used by the parties described, and that elegance of language  would be as much out of place as are the polished classical sentences of  Shenstone' s rustics, so often and so justly a theme of censure  .-Adapted from  the Newcastle Song Book or Tyne-Side Songster, W.& T. Fordyce, Newcastle Upon Tyne. 

 

 

 

 


 

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the Keel Row Billy Boy When the Boat comes In The Row Between the Cages Andrew Carrr MyLord 'Size The Gunstan' Afloat Come Geordie--ha'd the Bairn or Aw wish thy Muther wad come Spottie
Keep your Feet StillGeordie Hinny The
Blaydon
Races
Dolia

______

A Parody Cuddy the Keelman's Lamentation for the Loss of His Do li a
 

Have you seen Elsie Marley? Sair Fyel'd Hinny The Fiery Clock Fyece The Sailors are a' at the Bar The Pitman's Courtship Here's The Tender Coming
Byker Hill The Lambton Worm Come ye not from Newcastle Cushie Butterfield Up the Raw Cappy's the Dog Use and Abuse The Weshin-Day The Tyne Exile's Lament
The Bonny Pit Laddie The Water of Tyne The Collier's Rant The Sandgate Lass's Lament The Amphitrite The Peacock Followed the Hen The Keelman's Reason for Attending Church The Little Pee-dee Holiday Gown
Bobby Shaftoe Newcastle Beer Canny Newcassel Buy Broom Buzzems Aboot the Bush Willy Hydrophobie The Jenny Hoolet or Lizzie Mudie's Ghost A.U. Hinny Burd The New Keel Row

Keel Row III

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The Keel Row


See also the The New Keel Row
pace
                              animate
"Weel may the keel Row! 
The "Tyneside National Anthem", as it has been called has been claimed- both melody and 
words-as Scottish. Mr. John Stokoe, in the monthly Chronicle,  shows this claim to be unfounded, 
and proves, by an interesting reference to William Shield, the famous Swalwell muscian that  "the 
Keel Row was a popular Tyneside melody bofore 1700. Few melodies, he adds, are so identified with 
a district as our simple nad beautiful melody of the "Keel Row" is associated with Norhumbria a 
nd Tyneside." 
-Allan's Illustrated Edition of Tyneside Songs and Readings....,
Thomas and George Allan, NewcastleUpon Tyne, 1891

music
                    iconclick for midi sound
For Notation click here.

As I came thro' Sandgate, thro' Sandgate, thro' Sandgate, 
As I came thro' Sandgate, I heard a lassie sing 
Weel may the keel row, the keel row, the keel row, 
Weel may the keel row that my laddie's in. 
 

Oh, wha's like my Johnnie, sae leish, sae blighe, sae bonny? 
He's foremost 'mang the mony Keel lads o' coaly Tyne. 
He'll set and row sae tightly, or in the dance sae sprightly 
He'll cut and shuffle sightly; 'tis true - were he not mine. 
 

He wears a blue bonnet, blue bonnet, blue bonnet, 
He wears a blue bonnet, a dimple in his chin; 
And weel may the keel row, the keel row, the keel row, 
And weel may the keel row that my laddie's in. 

My lad's ower bonnie, ower cannie, ower bonnie- 
My lad's ower cannie, for the coal trade--- 
He's fitter for a merchant, a merchant, a merchant, 
He's fitter for a merchant, than a man-o'O-war's blade. 

Bright star of Heaton, your ay wour darling sweet one, 
May Heaven'sblessings leet on you, your lady, bairins, and ye-- 
Weel may the keel row, &c. 

(Last verse addressed to  Sir Matthew White Ridley, of Heaton 
known as Canny Sir Matthew) 
Last two verses found in: 
The Bishoprick Garland, London, Nichols and Baldwin and Cradock, 1834, Graham, 1969. 

-Source for 1st three verses: A Beuk o' Newcassel Sangs.
Joseph Cawhall,
1888

In Allan the source is cited as Ritson's "Northumberland Garland," 1793.
Only the first and third verses are present. In the first the words are-
"As I went up Sandgate" in stead of thro'. This version is called the-
"Correct version" as opposed to the "Street Version"

Street Version The Keel Row

As aw was gawn thro' San'get, thro' San'get, thro' San'get,
As aw was gawn throi' San' get aw her'd th' lasses sing--
Weel may th' keel row, th' keel row, th' keel row,
Weel may th' keel row that maw lad's in!

He wears a blue bonnet, a bunch of ribbons on it ;
He wears a blue bonnet, a dimple in his chin:
And 'weel may th' keel row, th' keel row, th' keel row.
an' weel may th' keel row that may lad's in!

-Allan's Illustrated Edition of Tyneside Songs and Readings....,
Thomas and George Allan, NewcastleUpon Tyne, 1891 


 
 
 

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The New Keel Row
To the old tune 

Whe's like my Johnny, 
Sae leish, sae blithe, sae bonny, 
He's foremost 'mang the mony 
Keel lads o' Coaly Tyne; 
He'll set or row so tightly, 
Or in the dance so sprightly, 
He'll cu' and shuffle slightly, 
'Tis true--were he not mine. 

chorus: 

Weel may the keel row, 
The keel row, the keel row, 
Weel may the keel row, 
That my laddie's in; 
He wears a blue bonnet, 
A bonnet, a bonnet, 
He wears a blue bonnet, 
A dimple in his chin. 

He's ne mair learning, 
Than tells his weekly earning, 
Yet reet frae wrang discerning, 
Tho' brave, ne bruiser he; 
Thoi' he no worth a plack is, 
His awn coat on his back is, 
And nane can say that black is 
The white o' Johhny's ee. 

Each pay-day nearly, 
He takes his quairt right dearly, 
Then talks O, latin O,--cheerly, 
Or mavies jaws away; 
How caring not a feather, 
Nelson and he together, 
The springy French did lether, 
And gar'd them shab away. 

Were a' kings comparely, 
In each I'd spy fairly, 
An' ay wad Johnny barly, 
He gets sic bonny bairns; 
Go bon, the queen, or misses, 
But wad for Johnny's kisses, 
Luik upon as blisses, 
Scrimp meals, caff beds, and dairns. 

Wour lads, like their deddy, 
To fight the French are ready, 
But gie's a peache that's steady, 
And breed cheap as lang syne; 
May a' the press gangs perish, 
Each lass her laddy cherish; 
Lang may the Coal Trade flourish 
Upon the dingy Tyne. 

Breet Star o' Heaton, 
Your ay wour darling sweet'en, 
May heaveh's blessings leet on 
Your leady, bairns, and ye; 
God bless the King and Nation, 
Each bravely fill his station, 
Our canny Corporation, 
Lang may they sing wi'me 

-By TT, in: Bell also in Allan's Illustrated Edition of Tyneside Songs and Readings....,
Thomas and George Allan, NewcastleUpon Tyne, 1891 with the note: 
"The Oldest and by far the most popular, of all the additions 
to, or imitations of, the famous fragment, "The Keel Row." To the old tune". 
The author is listed as Thomas Thompson. 



Keel Row III

Chorus- 

Weel may the keel row, 
the keel row, the keel row, 
Weel may the keel row, and better may she speed: 
Weel may the keel row, the keel row, the keel row, 
Weel may the keel row, that gets athe bairns their breed. 

We teuk wor keel up to the dyke, 
Up to the dyke, up to the dyke, 
We teuk wor keel up to the dyke, 
And there we gat her load; 
Then sail'd away down to Shields, 
Down to Shields, down to Shields, 
Then sail'd away down to Shields, 
And shipp'd wor coals abroad. 
 

Then we row'd away up to the fest, 
Up to the fest, up to the fest, 
We row'd away up to the fest, 
Cheerly every man; 
Pat by wor gear and moor'd wor keel, 
And moor'd wor keel, and Moor'd wor keel, 
Pat by wor gear and moor'd wor keel, 
Then went and drak wor can, 

Our canny wives, our clean fireside, 
Our bonny bairns, their parent's pride, 
Sweet smiles that make life smoothly glide, 
We find when we gan hyem: 
They'll work for us when we get au'd, 
The'll keep us frae the winter's cau'd; 
As lifedeclines they'll us uphaud-- 
When young we uphaud them. 

-T. Thompson (Listed as Keel Row "New" --In: The Newcastle Song Book
or Tyne-Side Songster., W&T Fordyce 
Newcastle Upon Tyne. 

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The Row Between The Cagespace animate
For Notation Click Here
For Midi Sound Click here

 One mornen wen aw went ta wark, th'seet wis most exsiten. 
 Aw ard a noise en luckt aroond, en we de ye think wis fiten? 
 Aw stud amaisd en at thim gaisd, te see thim in such raiges, 
 For aw nivor seed e row like that between th' Brockwil caiges. 

 Wor aud caige sais: "Cum over th' gaits, becaws it's mei intenshin 
 To let th' see wethor too or me is th' best invenshin." 
 Th' neuin been raised, teuk off his clais, then at it thae went dabbin; 
 Th' blud wis runnen doon th' skeets an past th' weimin's cabin. 

 Wor aud caige sais: "Let's heh me clais; thoo thwot thit thoo cud flae me, 
 But if aw'd been is young is thoo, aw's certain aw cud pae thee." 
 Th' patent knockt hees ankel off, en th' buaith ad cutten fuaices. 
 Th' shifters rapt three for te ride, so th' buaith went te thor plaices. 

 Wen gannen up en doon th' shaft, th' paitint caige did threetin 
 For te tuaik wor audin's life if thae stopt it meeten. 
 Wor aud caige bawld oot is thae passt: "Thoo nasty dorty paitint, 
 Rub thee ies eguain th' skeets -aw think too's ardly wakinit." 

 Th' patint te wor aud caige sais: "Altho aw be a strangoer, 
 Aw kin work me wark is weel is thoo, an free th' men freh daingor. 
 Noo, if th' rope shub brick we me, aud skinny jaws, just watch us- 
 Thoo'll see me clag on te th' skeets, for aw's full e springs en catches." 

 Wor aud caige te th' paitint sais: "Aw warned thoo think thoo's clivor 
 Becaws thi'v polished thoo we paint, but thoo'l not last for ivor. 
 The paint on thoo 'ill wer awae, an then thoo's lost thei beuty; 
 Th' nivor painted me at aal, en still aw've deun my deuty." 

 Th' braiksmin browt thim buaith te bank, th' mischeef for te sattil, 
 Thae fit frae five o'clock te six, en th' paitint won th' battle. 
 It teuk th' braiksmin half e shift te clag thim up wi plaistors. 
 Wor aud caige sent hees noatece in, but just te vex th' maistors. 

 The song was written by Tommy Armstrong (1848-1919) of Tanfield, County Durham.  The above is as he wrote it, "Pitmatic" dialect and all, and is taken from A.L Lloyd's Folk Song in 
 England.  The song was set to a traditional melody, used earlier by Alexander Rodger for Robin Tamson's Smiddy. 

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Do-lli-apace animate
music animateFor Midi Sound Click here!  Alternative Midi Topliff Click here
For notation click here

 

 

Fresh aw cum frae Sandgate Street, 
Dol-li, dol-li 
Maw best freends here to meet, 
Dol-li-a 
Dol-li the dillen dol, 
Dol-li, dol-li 
Dol-li th dillen dol, 
Dol-li-a 
 

The Black Cuffs is gawn away, 
Dol-li, dol-li, 
An' that'll be a crying day 
Dol-li-a 
Dol-li the dillen dol, 
Dol-li, dol-li 
Dol-li th dillen dol, 
Dol-li-a 
 

Dolly Coxon's pawn'd her sark,
Do li, do li,
To ride upon the baggage cart.
Do li a, &c-*

The Green Cuffs is cummin' in, 
Dol-li, dol-li, 
An' that'll make the lasses sing 
Dol-li-a 
Dol-li the dillen dol, 
Dol-li, dol-li 
Dol-li th dillen dol, 
Dol-li-a 

-Allan's Illustrated Edition of Tyneside Songs and Readings....,
Thomas and George Allan, Newcastle Upon Tyne, 1891 with the note: 
"A song famous in Newcastle about the years 1792-3-4. The "Black Cuffs", 
the North York Militia, The "Green Cuffs", the 23rd Ulster Dragoons. 

From John Bell, Rhymes of Northern Bards 1812,

From:"A Song Sung in Newcastle in the year 1792-3-4"  Newcastle Songster., J. Marshall, Old Flesh Market, Newcastle upon Tyne., c.1812.

Another version

Cuddy the Keelman's Lamentation for the Loss of His Do li a
 

Fresh he's gone from the Quay-side,
Do li, Do li,
With  Tomy Annett for his guide
Do li a
All the way to Jackey Gales,
Do li, Do li.
Who put him in behind the rails,
Do li a,
There to sing a do'eful Sang,
Do li, Do li,
As ever sure was penn'd by man,
Do li a.
For Dicky Gossop's cracks are laid,
Do li, Do li,
He cannot now pursue his trade,
Do li a.
When a nurse he did appear,
Do li, Do li,
You all then grinn'd from ear to ear,
Do li a.
But no one now will father the brat,
Do li, Dop li,
You well know the cause of that,
Do li a.
Yet cheer thee up poor Peeping Tom,
Do li, Do0 li,
Sure thou'll get out before 'tis long,
Do li a.
In the mean time we will agree,
Do li, Do li,
To come and strive to comfort thee,
Do li a.
 
Although time is on the wing,
Do li, Do li,
We yet have home to hear thee sing
 Do li a.

-Joyhn Bell, c. 1795. (Parody, contemporary with earliest known original)

Mentioned on the same scrap page from Bell is a theatre advertisement for "For the Benefit of Mr. Wilson, On Wednesday Evening January 7, 1795....The Peeping Tom and of Act second Do li A In the Character of a Sandgate Lady!!!" Bell's inscription is curious: "on part two of the three lines "Another set from Topliff" then parallel to lyrics- "The Sedcond Set is from Topliff's Select Melodies of Norhumberland and Durham...published about 18 and is most probably the correct one..." None the less one wonders what the first one is and why they are together...

-could it originate from the word "douleia" italian or greek.....

Note that the famous arranger Topliff (yes correct is without the e at the end...) was cited in later collections.

Topliff, Robert

 R. Topliff
Holborn ; London, C.1815  Selection of the most popular melodies of the Tyne and the Wear consisting of 24 original airs peculiar to the counties of Durham and Northumberland, three of which are harmonized with appropriate words, symphonies and accompaniments and the remainder variously arranged for the piano forte. Repectfully inscribed ... by ... Robert Topliff. The original words given at the end.


The notation first below is that from Bell who referenced topliff. His notation is just above the key change



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Billy Boy
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Where have ye been all the day, Billy Boy, Billy Boy? 
Where have ye been all the day, me Billy Boy? 
I've been walking all the day 
With me charming Nancy Grey. 
 

Chorus And so me Nancy kittled me fancy, 
Oh me charming Billy Boy. 
 

Is she fit to be your wife, Billy Boy, Billy Boy? 
Is she fit to be your wife, me Billy Boy? 
She as fit to be my wife 
As the fork is to the knife. 
 

Chorus 
 

Can she cook a bit o' steak, Billy Boy, Billy Boy? 
Can she cook a bit o' steak, me Billy Boy? 
She can cook a bit o' steak, 
Aye, and make a girdle cake. 
 

Chorus 
 

Can she make an Irish stew, Billy Boy, Billy Boy? 
Can she make an Irish stew, me Billy Boy? 
She can make an Irish stew, 
Aye, and 'Singin' Hinnies' too. 
 

A fancy version!


 
 
 
 
 
 

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When the Boat comes in/Dance to thy Daddy pace animate
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Come here me little Jacky, 
now ah've smoked me baccy, 
let's hev a bit of cracky, 
till the boat comes in. 
Dance to thee Daddy, sing to thee Mammy, 
dance to thee Daddy, to thee Mammy sing; 

Thou shalt hev a fishy on a little dishy, 

thou shalt hev a fishy when the boat comes in. 

Here's thy mother humming, 
like a canny woman; 
Yonder comes thy fatha, 
drunk - he cannat stand. 

Dance to thee Daddy, sing to thee Mammy, 
dance to thee Daddy, to thee Mammy sing; 
Thou shalt hev a fishy on a little dishy, 
thou shalt hev a haddock when the boat comes in 

Our Tommy's always fuddling, 
he's so fond of ale, 
but he's kind to me, 
I hope he'll never fail. 

Dance to thee Daddy, sing to thee Mammy, 
dance to thee Daddy, to thee Mammy sing; 
Thou shalt hev a fishy on a little dishy, 
thou shalt hev a Bloater when the boat comes in 

I like a drop mesel', 
when I can get it sly, 
and thou, my bonny bairn, 
will like't as well as I. 

Dance to thee Daddy, sing to thee Mammy, 
dance to thee Daddy, to thee Mammy sing; 
Thou shalt hev a fishy on a little dishy, 
thou shalt hev a Mackerel when the boat comes in. 

May we get a drop, 
oft as we stand in need; 
and weel may the keel row 
that brings the bairns tha breed. 

Dance to thee Daddy, sing to thee Mammy, 
dance to thee Daddy, to thee Mammy sing; 
Thou shalt hev a fishy on a little dishy, 
thou shalt hev a Salmon when the boat comes in. 

-In Allan's Illustrated Edition of Tyneside Songs and Readings....,
Thomas and George Allan, NewcastleUpon Tyne, 1891. Author lsited 
as Watson and source: Fordyce's "Newcastle song Book," 1842"


 
 
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Keep your feet still Geordie Hinny!pace animate

 

Keep Yor Feet Still!

Teun- "Nelly Gray."

Wor Geordey an' Bob Jonsin byeth lay i' one bed,
Iv a little lodgjin hoose that's doon the shore,
Before Bob  had been an' oor asleep, a kick frae Geordey's fut
Myed him wakin up to roar instead o' snore.

Korus.
"Keep yor feet still! Geordey, hinny, let's bve happy for the neet,
For aw maynit be se happy throo the day.
So give us that bit cumfort, --keep yor feet still, Geordey lad,
An' dinnet send maw bonny dreams away!"

Aw dreamt thor was a dancin held, an' Mary Clark wes there;
An' aw thowt we tript it leetly on the floor,
An' aw prest her heevin breest te mine when walsin roond the room,
That's mair than aw dor ivor de before.

Ye'll knaw the lad that she gans with, they call him Jimmy Green,
Aw thowt he tried te spoil us i' wor fun,
But aw dreamt aw nail;'d him heavy, an' blackt the big feul's eyes;
If aw'd slept it's hard to tell what aw wad deun.

Aw thowt aw set her hyem that neet, content we went alang.
Aw kiss'd her lips a hundred times or mair,
An' aw wish'd the road wad nivor end, se happy like wes aw,
Aw cud wlak'd a thoosind miles wi' Mary there!

Aw dremt Jim Green had left the toon an' left his luv te me,
An' aw thowt the hoose wis furnish'd wi' the best,
An' aw dreamt aw just had left the church wi' Mary be me side,
When yor clumsy feet completely spoil'd the rest."
 

-Joe Wilson
 


 All rise for the National Anthem of Geordie Land!

The Blaydon Races pace animate1/2

Tune= Brighton 
For midi sound click here
For midi sound click here.
For notation click here

I went to Blaydon Races, 'twas on the ninth of June, 
Eighteen hundred on sixty-two on a summer's efternoon. 
I tyuk the bus fra Balmbra's an' she was heavy laden. 
Away we went along Collingwood street that's on the road to Blaydon. 

Chorus - 
Oh! lads ye shud of seen us gannin', 
We pass'd  the foaks along the road Just as they wor stannin'; 
Thor wes lots o' lads and lasses there,  all wi' smiling faces, 
Gawn alang the Scotswood Road To see the Blaydon Races. 
 

We flew past Armstrong's factory and up to the 'Robin Adair' 
Just gannin doon te  the railway bridge the bus wheel flew off there. 
The lassies lost their crinolines off, an' the  veils that hide their faces 
An' aw  got two black eyes an' a broken nose  in gan te Blaydon Races. 

Chorus 
 

When we gat the wheel put on, away we went agyen, 
But them that had their noses broke they cam back ower hyem; 
Sum went to the dispensary an' uthers to Dr. Gibbs 
An' sum sought out  the Infirmary to mend their broken ribs. 

Chorus 
Now when we got to Paradise thor wes bonny gam begun; 
There were fower-and-twenty on the 'bus, man, hoo they  danced and sung; 
 They called on me to sing a sang,  I sung  them 'Paddy Fagan", 
Aw danced a jig an'  swung me twig the day I went to Blaydon. 

Chorus 
We flew across the Chain Bridge reet into Blaydon toon 
The bellmen he was callin' there they called him Jackey Brown; 
Aw saw him talkin' to sum cheps, an' them he was persuadin' 
To gan an' see Geordy Ridley's show in the Mechanics Hall at Blaydon. 

Chorus: 
The rain it poor'd all the day, an' myed  the groons quite muddy 
'Coffy Johnny' had a white hat on-they war shootin'  "Whe stole the cuddy" 
There wes spice stalls an' munkey shows, and an' aud wives sellin ciders, 
An' a chep wvi' a hapenny roond aboot shootin' "Now,  me boys,  for 
riders." 

-In Allan's Illustrated Edition of Tyneside Songs and Readings....,
Thomas and George Allan, NewcastleUpon Tyne, 1891. 
With the Note: Ridley (Geordie) Author's Manuscript 1862. 
-The Whisky Priests have used this tune for their song "The Car-Boot Sale" 

 

Earlier "Original Version"

BLAYDON RACES.
Tune—"Brighton."

1. Aw went to Blaydon Races, 'twas on the ninth of Joon,
Eiteen hundred an' sixty-two, on a summer's efternoon;
Aw tyuk the 'bus frae Balmbra's, an' she wis heavy laden,
Away we went alang Collingwood Street, that's on the road to Blaydon.

CHORUS: O lads, ye shud only seen us gannin',
We pass'd the foaks upon the road just as they wor stannin';
Thor wes lots o' lads an' lasses there, all wi' smiling faces,
Gawn alang the Scotswood Road, to see the Blaydon Races.

2. We flew past Airmstrang's factory, and up to the "Robin Adair,"
Just gannin doon te the railway bridge, the 'bus wheel flew off there.
The lasses lost their crinolines off, an' the veils that hide their faces,
An' aw got two black eyes an' a broken nose in gan te Blaydon Races.

3. When we gat the wheel put on away we went agyen,
But them that had their noses broke, they cam back ower hyem;
Sum went to the dispensary, an' uthers to Doctor Gibbs,
An' sum sought out the Infirmary to mend their broken ribs.

4. Noo when we gat to Paradise thor wes bonny gam begun;
Thor wes fower-and-twenty on the 'bus, man, hoo they danced an' sung;
They called on me to sing a sang, aw sung them "Paddy Fagan,"
Aw danced a jig an' swung my twig that day aw went to Blaydon.

5. We flew across the Chain Bridge reet into Blaydon toon,
The bellman he was callin' there—they call him Jackey Brown;
Aw saw him talkin' to sum cheps, an' them he was pursuadin'
To gan an' see Geordy Ridley's concert in the Mechanics' Hall at Blaydon.

6. The rain it poor'd aw the day, an' myed the groons quite muddy,
Coffy Johnny had a white hat on—they war shootin' "Whe stole the cuddy."
There wes spice stalls an' munkey shows, an' aud wives selling ciders,
An' a chep wiv a happeny roond aboot shootin' "Now, me boys, for riders."


Ridley. Author's Manuscript, 1862.


 
 

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Durham, and the Coaly Tyne

Off To NewcastlePicture ofNewcastle

From Haslop Northumbrian Words


Picture of Durham
Off To Durham County

Durham University

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Culture!!!!!and Geordies too!
Where is Newcastle upon Tyne? Just clickit right here!

To view the picture: The Blaydon Races by William C. Irving click here

Broon Ale

War Songs of Newcastle United

Music Events and things to do  in the North East


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Send Me e.Mail-Mail me Whisky!

This is just a Start There will Be More Soon!

pace animatemusicanimateHere's the tender comming....musicanimatepace animate
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